Rock Cellar Store

Before "Svengali" came to describe any vaguely megalomaniacal personality in the entertainment industry-from the genuinely evil Phil Spector and Colonel Tom Parker all the way to their Diet Rite equivalent Jack Antonoff-he was a literary character who was probably the prototypical megalomaniacal personality in the entertainment industry. The antagonist in the famously mid and otherwise unmemorable 19th century novel Trilby, Svengali is depicted as a machiavellian manipulator who transforms the guileless titular character into a famous singer. Mo Troper's Svengali is a deeply psychological record with the throbbing heart of a fragile giant. It is a meditation on evil-ness. At certain points across Svengali's 13 tracks, Troper relishes his own innate evil-ness; just as often he's repulsed by it. Like any Mxo Troper album, Svengali is a collection of razor-sharp pop songs that sound like they were written yesterday, or in 1990 by Paddy McAloon, or in 1966 by Brian Wilson, or in 1936 by some unheralded Tin Pan Alley great. Troper has always belonged in the Pop Hook Hall of Fame but his latest and sixth LP of original material is, lyrically, a "look, there are levels to this" moment.
Before "Svengali" came to describe any vaguely megalomaniacal personality in the entertainment industry-from the genuinely evil Phil Spector and Colonel Tom Parker all the way to their Diet Rite equivalent Jack Antonoff-he was a literary character who was probably the prototypical megalomaniacal personality in the entertainment industry. The antagonist in the famously mid and otherwise unmemorable 19th century novel Trilby, Svengali is depicted as a machiavellian manipulator who transforms the guileless titular character into a famous singer. Mo Troper's Svengali is a deeply psychological record with the throbbing heart of a fragile giant. It is a meditation on evil-ness. At certain points across Svengali's 13 tracks, Troper relishes his own innate evil-ness; just as often he's repulsed by it. Like any Mxo Troper album, Svengali is a collection of razor-sharp pop songs that sound like they were written yesterday, or in 1990 by Paddy McAloon, or in 1966 by Brian Wilson, or in 1936 by some unheralded Tin Pan Alley great. Troper has always belonged in the Pop Hook Hall of Fame but his latest and sixth LP of original material is, lyrically, a "look, there are levels to this" moment.
810097915992
Mo Troper - Svengali (Brwn) [Colored Vinyl]

Details

Format: Vinyl
Label: RUN FOR COVER
Rel. Date: 05/03/2024
UPC: 810097915992

Svengali (Brwn) [Colored Vinyl]
Artist: Mo Troper
Format: Vinyl
New: Not in stock
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Bleach
2. The Billy Joel Fan Club
3. Too Far Gone (Chainman's Theme from the Film Tony's Dilemma)
4. Spark World
5. You Always Loved Me
6. The Face of Kindness
7. You Called Me Your Baby
8. For You to Sing
9. A Piece of You Broken Through My Heart
10. Recipe for Loving
11. Before I Went Bad
12. Push Around

More Info:

Before "Svengali" came to describe any vaguely megalomaniacal personality in the entertainment industry-from the genuinely evil Phil Spector and Colonel Tom Parker all the way to their Diet Rite equivalent Jack Antonoff-he was a literary character who was probably the prototypical megalomaniacal personality in the entertainment industry. The antagonist in the famously mid and otherwise unmemorable 19th century novel Trilby, Svengali is depicted as a machiavellian manipulator who transforms the guileless titular character into a famous singer. Mo Troper's Svengali is a deeply psychological record with the throbbing heart of a fragile giant. It is a meditation on evil-ness. At certain points across Svengali's 13 tracks, Troper relishes his own innate evil-ness; just as often he's repulsed by it. Like any Mxo Troper album, Svengali is a collection of razor-sharp pop songs that sound like they were written yesterday, or in 1990 by Paddy McAloon, or in 1966 by Brian Wilson, or in 1936 by some unheralded Tin Pan Alley great. Troper has always belonged in the Pop Hook Hall of Fame but his latest and sixth LP of original material is, lyrically, a "look, there are levels to this" moment.
        
back to top